Make Kitco Your Homepage

Gold Market Shouldn't Fear Powell Or Taylor-Led Fed

Kitco News

(Kitco News) - Jitters over who will lead the Federal Reserve for the next four years continues to ripple through financial markets, keeping a lid on gold prices, but one analyst warns that this is a distraction for investors.

In a recent interview with Kitco News Chantelle Schieven, head of research at Murenbeeld & Co., said that her firm is expecting to see higher gold prices next year on the back of low interest rates, no matter who the new Federal Reserve Chair is.

December gold futures last traded at $1,272.70 an ounce, down 0.38% on the day.

Schieven’s comments come as the Federal Reserve kicks off the first of its two-day monetary policy meeting. Markets are not expecting any change in interest rates but are instead focused on who will lead the central bank starting in January.

President Donald Trump is expected to release his Fed pick this week. Federal Reserve Governor Jerome Powell and Stanford economist John Taylor are the two frontrunners in the race. Markets are giving a slight lead to Powell, who is seen as the less hawkish of the two.

Schieven said that Taylor’s nomination could create a knee-jerk reaction lower in gold; however, it shouldn’t hurt the metal’s long-term potential as the reality sets in that interest rates won’t go aggressively higher.

She noted that there are several factors that will limit the central bank’s monetary policy, including the U.S. tax plan, which some economists have said could add $1.5 trillion to the debt in 10 years.

“If you start raising interest rates now, the cost of servicing that debt is going to be enormous,” she said. “A global debt crisis is building and that will be a long-term factor for gold.”

Another factor that will keep a lid on interest rates is the international bond market. The Federal Reserve is the only major central bank in a new tightening cycle; The European Central Bank, despite talks of eventually tapering, and the Bank of Japan are still pumping liquidity into financial markets.

“International bond yields are low enough and not expected to rise anytime soon and that will keep a lid on U.S. bond yields,” she said.

Technically, Schieven said that gold remains in a two-year uptrend as long as prices hold above $1,250 an ounce.

“Gold will get its bid. It’s just a question of when,” she said.

As to what could be the fuse for gold’s new rally, Schieven said that investors should look at equity markets. She noted that sentiment, which has driven equity markets to record highs, could change very quickly and investors will be happy to have gold in their portfolio as an insurance policy.

“If you wait for risk-aversion sentiment to pick up then it’s going to be too late to get into gold,” she said.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the author and may not reflect those of Kitco Metals Inc. The author has made every effort to ensure accuracy of information provided; however, neither Kitco Metals Inc. nor the author can guarantee such accuracy. This article is strictly for informational purposes only. It is not a solicitation to make any exchange in commodities, securities or other financial instruments. Kitco Metals Inc. and the author of this article do not accept culpability for losses and/ or damages arising from the use of this publication.

Precious Metal Charts

Follow Kitco News

Cambridge House Silver & Gold Summit 2017